Samson Is A Needed Case Study

We use Samson as a what-not-to-do case study in a much too limited and infrequent way.

Rarely do I hear Samson brought up. When I do, it’s usually accompanied by something along the lines of, “Don’t get swept away by that guy or girl, folks.” But his story is so much broader and important than simply what occurred with Delilah.

Samson was arrogant. He was self-centered. He was proud. He was consumed with his own glory. He fell for women and fell HARD. He effectively ignored the vision his parents had cast since his birth. He broke the laws of God and of Israel.

I’ve been reading through Judges in the last weeks, and one thing has been made very clear to me: His encounters with Delilah didn’t take place in a vortex. Samson was not suddenly tempted to be with Delilah; he was just continuing to take the next logical step down the path of sin he was walking.

The first point in studying Samson is to realize that he was not a man living for God that was suddenly made weak by a woman. He was consumed by sin, had a veneer of holiness in the form of a Nazirite vow, and made no efforts to turn and repent. His story is one of the killing impact of sin.

Yet, God still used him. It was made clear that while Samson’s parents were perplexed by his behavior, God fully grasped it and wove it into a plan to see His own will done and His own glory achieved:

 

“His father and mother did not know that it was from the Lord, for he was seeking an opportunity against the Philistines.” (Judges 14:4)

 

The sin of Samson did not negate the sovereignty of God.

Look upon the story of Samson and let it do two things: remind you that sin is a killer and should not easily dwell in your life, and that God is still greater than your sin and will use you for HIS purposes.

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